Shattered Dreams Program Guide - City of Waco

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Summary of Shattered Dreams Program Guide - City of Waco

“Shattered Dreams” a guide for program planners Second Edition 1 Edited by: Michelle Price, M.Ed., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Lt. Christina Guerra, The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission Lizette Muñoz, B.A., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Camerino Salazar, M.S., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio With Contributions from: Ella Carrasco, MADD Greater Alamo Area Chapter Michael Curd, Methodist Healthcare Sherrilee A. Demmer, RN, BSN, Wilford Hall Medical Center Laura B. Fornos, M.A., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Mary Hibbs, Arlington Independent School District Yvonne Holguin-Duran, University Health System Muriel Lanford, MSN, RN, CEN, Baptist Health System Jennifer Northway B.S., CHES, Methodist Healthcare Teresa I. Rodriguez, BSN, RN, CEN, University Health System Julie A. Wright, J.D., Bexar County Criminal District Attorney’s Office A publication of: The South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Funded by: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission Shattered Dreams: A Guide for Program Planners 2 This publication was produced under the US Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Contract # 2001-AH-FX-4048 with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) and the TABC’s Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Contract #81003 with the South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio to improve compliance with underage drinking laws. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or policies of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention or the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. No official endorsement by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention or the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission of any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in this publication is intended or should be inferred. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention J. Robert Flores Administrator Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission Alan Steen Administrator © 2004 This publication is in the public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or part is granted. While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: Price, M.A., Guerra, C., Muñoz, C.L., Salazar, C.I. (Eds.). (2004) Shattered Dreams: A Guide for Program Planners (2nd ed.). University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center To order copies of this publication, write to: The South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, Mail Stop 7791 San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (210) 567-7826 FAX: (210) 567-7855 This publication is also available on the following websites: • The South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center at http://sthrc.uthscsa.edu/stiprc/ • The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission at http://www.tabc.state.tx.us/ Layout and design by: esd & associates, San Antonio, TX, www.esdandassociates.com 3 Foreword ...................................................................................................................................................................... 5 About the guide and Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................. 6 Project overview and history ................................................................................................................................... 7 Underage drinking and impaired driving............................................................................................................... 8 Effectiveness of Shattered Dreams....................................................................................................................... 12 Getting Started .......................................................................................................................................................... 15 Start-up Team Activities ................................................................................................................................. 18 Creating Program Teams ................................................................................................................................ 19 Team Assignment Sheet ................................................................................................................................. 21 Master Program Activities List ...................................................................................................................... 22 Campus Organization............................................................................................................................................... 29 Campus Team Activities.................................................................................................................................. 30 Sample releases and permission forms....................................................................................................... 35 Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Objectives ........................................................................ 37 Operations ................................................................................................................................................................. 41 Operations Team Activities ............................................................................................................................ 42 Day 1 Schedule (crash scene, living dead, etc) ......................................................................................... 43 Day 2 Schedule (assembly, debriefing)........................................................................................................ 45 Parent - Student Workshop .................................................................................................................................... 47 Parent-Student Workshop Team Activities ................................................................................................. 49 Agenda .............................................................................................................................................................. 50 Activity Materials............................................................................................................................................. 51 Sample letters and forms ............................................................................................................................... 53 The Living Dead ........................................................................................................................................................ 55 Living Dead Team Activities ........................................................................................................................... 56 Instructions for Living Dead participants .................................................................................................... 58 Mock Crash ............................................................................................................................................................... 59 Mock Crash Team Activities .......................................................................................................................... 60 Instructions for Mock Crash participants.................................................................................................... 61 Mock Death Notification......................................................................................................................................... 63 Mock Death Notification Team Activities .................................................................................................... 64 Table of Contents 4 Student Retreat ......................................................................................................................................................... 65 Student Retreat Team Activities.................................................................................................................... 69 Agenda .............................................................................................................................................................. 71 Activity Materials............................................................................................................................................. 72 Parent Retreat ........................................................................................................................................................... 93 Parent Retreat Team Activities...................................................................................................................... 95 Agenda .............................................................................................................................................................. 96 Activity Materials............................................................................................................................................. 97 Mock Memorial ...................................................................................................................................................... 105 Mock Memorial Team Activities.................................................................................................................. 106 Activity Materials........................................................................................................................................... 107 Student – Parent Support...................................................................................................................................... 111 Student-Parent Support Team Activities ................................................................................................... 114 Debriefing Session Format ........................................................................................................................... 115 Public Relations ..................................................................................................................................................... 117 Public Relations Team Activities ................................................................................................................. 118 Logo Use Guidelines and Agreement......................................................................................................... 121 Mock Trial (Optional)............................................................................................................................................. 127 Mock Trial Team Activities ........................................................................................................................... 130 Program Impact (Optional) ................................................................................................................................... 131 Program Impact Team Activities ................................................................................................................. 133 Suggested Survey.......................................................................................................................................... 134 Scholarship Team (Optional)................................................................................................................................ 141 Scholarship Team Activities......................................................................................................................... 142 Sample Donation Request Letter ................................................................................................................ 143 Follow-up activities ............................................................................................................................................... 145 Recommended follow-up activities ............................................................................................................ 146 5 Foreword The tragic loss of life, productivity, and potential resulting from teen drinking and driving is staggering. The following data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration illustrate the effects: • Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for people from 15 to 20 years old. (NHTSA, 2003) • In 2002, 3,827 drivers 15 to 20 years old were killed, and an additional 324,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes in the United States. Twenty-nine percent of these teen drivers had been drinking. (NHTSA, 2003) • About three out of ten Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related auto crash at some time during their lives. (MADD, 2003) This needless suffering can be prevented, and I applaud those interested in reducing the tragic waste of life and potential. The attitudes of some teens influence the development of the problem of underage drinking and driving. Teens do not expect to be injured, much less to die from injury. Some even view disability or death from injury as an act of God or as an unpreventable accident. Such beliefs make it difficult for them to assume responsibility for the consequences of their actions. In addition, many teens and adults do not appreciate the sheer magnitude of the results of drinking and driving. The number of teens who die annually in alcohol-related crashes is equivalent to having a 727 aircraft full of teenagers crash every two weeks. One can imagine the media attention that would be directed toward the crash of a commercial airliner filled with teenagers; however, this same number of teen deaths on the nation’s roadways is barely even noticed. I support the Shattered Dreams program because it is designed to prevent the many problems resulting from teen drinking and driving. Through role-playing, teens and parents are exposed to the seriousness of such problems. Students, who act out the death of teens, visibly engage their peers to consider the gravity of the problem. Abstract concepts become more concrete, and the consequences of actions become obvious. Shattered Dreams is an educational program, not just a one-time scare tactic. Please consider the severity of the problem of drinking and driving. Then, I encourage you to commit yourself, your school personnel, and those in your community to the prevention of this problem through your participation in the Shattered Dream program. Ronald M. Stewart, M.D. Trauma Medical Director, University Hospital, San Antonio, Texas University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 6 About the Guide This guide is designed to walk Shattered Dreams planners through all of the steps necessary for a successful program. Each section of the guide tackles one program component providing an overview, purpose, activity list, suggested agenda, forms, and other materials. This is the second edition of the program guide. Several improvements have been made to the program and planning materials since the first edition (1998) based on lessons learned while conducting the program at more than 200 schools across Texas. Importantly, parental involvement has been increased with two new components: the parent – student workshop and the parent retreat. These components emphasize the important role that parents play in preventing underage drinking and impaired driving. Both have been developed to complement the existing program components. This guide is free for use by any school or community interested in conducting a Shattered Dreams program. Please feel free to duplicate sections and use sample materials. Letters and forms should be modified as needed to meet local school or district requirements. In addition to the contributors to this revision of manual, the editors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the Texas Shattered Dreams Coalition that developed and expanded the Shattered Dreams program. Among the hundreds of concerned individuals and institutions which have assisted in this endeavor, the following are recognized for their extraordinary efforts: Airlife Medical Transport, Jacque Burandt, MEd (University Health System), George Castaneda (San Antonio Police Department), Machele Cevallos (San Antonio Fire/EMS), Susan Douglass, MSN, RN (University Health System), Henry Galindo (Harlandale ISD), Greg Hamilton (Former Chief of Enforcement for TABC), Sarah M. Harding, MA (South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center), Christine Hernandez (Former State Representative), George B. Hernandez, Jr., JD, (University Health System), Randy Jenkins (San Antonio Fire/EMS), Julie Klumpyan (Valero), Richard Long (San Antonio Police Department), Tom Longo (USAA), Danny Muzny (San Antonio Police Department), Cheryl Narvaez (Harlandale ISD), Albert C. Ramirez, Ronald M. Stewart, MD (University of Texas Health Science Center @ San Antonio), Roberto Villarreal, MD (The University of Texas Health Science Center @ San Antonio) Acknowledgments 7 Project Overview and History Shattered Dreams is a two-day, school-based program that promotes responsible decision-making among high school students regarding underage drinking and impaired driving (driving after drinking or riding with a drinking driver) by showing them how irresponsible choices can end all dreams. The program was developed by the Bexar County DWI Task Force Advisory Board on Underage Drinking in 1998 as an expansion of the “Every 15 Minutes” program introduced in Chico, California. The “Every 15 Minutes” program was started by the Chico Police Department and named to signify the number of alcohol-related fatalities in the United States during the mid nineties. The Shattered Dreams program emphasizes the results of alcohol-related crashes: the shattered dreams of those who drive after drinking, the innocent victims, and their friends and families. Shattered Dreams is designed to be a comprehensive underage drinking and impaired driving prevention program that involves the school administration and faculty, students, parents, community organizations, law enforcement, emergency medical services, and area hospitals in the planning and implementation of the activities. Due to the comprehensive nature of the program, planning with these organizations usually begins six months prior to the main two-day event. The partnership between the school and community organizations serves as a foundation for follow-up activities to reinforce the program’s prevention messages. The program includes the following interactive components: • Parent – student workshop • The Living Dead • Mock alcohol-related crash (including medical and law enforcement response) • Mock death notifications • Student retreat • Parent retreat • Mock memorial • Mock sentencing trial (optional) These interactive components are supplemented with student-parent support, public relations, evaluation and follow-up activities. Aspects of most of the activities can be incorporated into the classroom according to the Texas Education Agency’s Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Unless noted as optional, each program component should be included in any Shattered Dreams event to be sure the full impact is achieved. 8 Underage Drinking and Impaired Driving Shattered Dreams began as a response to a community need to prevent injury and death resulting from underage drinking and impaired driving crashes. The program was originally modeled on another community-driven intervention with the goal of first raising awareness of ‘real life’ risks and then changing students’ and parents’ beliefs and behaviors as well as the community at large to reduce underage drinking and impaired driving (driving after drinking or riding with a drinking driver). Since its inception, the developers of Shattered Dreams have collaborated with injury prevention and behavioral researchers to better understand how the program influences young people, their parents, community members and school systems. The result has been the application of behavioral theories that shed light on the problems of underage drinking and impaired driving as well as how people change after participating in the program. Underage Drinking Underage drinking is a significant risk factor for teens in Texas. In a recent survey, about half of teens reported drinking in the past thirty days1. Thirty-one percent of teens also reported binge drinking (having five or more drinks on one occasion). Most high school students (71%) report that alcohol is easy to obtain with most getting it from friends and at parties2. Research has shown that alcohol affects youth differently than adults. Because the adolescent brain is still developing, it is much more vulnerable to the long-term effects of alcohol3. Teen drinkers may suffer damage to the hippocampus, the part of the brain associated with learning and memory, and the prefrontal cortex, which controls executive functions like decision-making and attention. Damage to these and other structures can result in decreased brain functioning and size. In fact the brains of teen drinkers have been found to be roughly 10% smaller than non-drinking teens (due to cell death and shrinkage). Environmental issues play a major role in underage drinking. Having friends who drink, attitudes of parents toward drinking, and alcohol advertising all influence teens’ decisions4. Teens with friends who drink are much more likely to drink. Similarly, teens whose parents are accepting of underage drinking are more likely to do so. Recent studies have also shown that youth are overexposed to alcohol advertising in the US5. These studies have shown a strong correlation between higher retention of advertising messages (such as remembering slogans) and positive attitudes toward drinking6. Teens who drink often display other risky behaviors. In a national survey of youth in grades 7-12, underage drinkers also reported: • Driving after drinking • Physical fighting in the past year • Carrying a weapon • Being truant More than 36% of adolescent drinkers reported engaging in at least one alcohol-related risky behavior suggesting the need for programs that not only address underage drinking but also address other risky behaviors7. Impaired Driving Although youth are less likely to drive after drinking than adults, their risk of being involved in a crash when they do is much higher8. The increased risk begins at low levels of alcohol consumption and is probably due to the combination of alcohol with driver inexperience. Teen drivers with blood alcohol content levels between 0.05-0.08 are far more likely to be involved in a crash than sober teen drivers (17 times more likely for males and 7 times more likely for females). On average, one quarter of drivers between the ages 16-19 who are killed in crashes are legally intoxicated. Texas leads the nation in alcohol-related crash deaths among 15 to 20 year olds9. In 2000, almost half of the fatal car crashes among 15 to 20 year olds were alcohol-related. About 16% of high school students recently reported driving after drinking and 40% reported riding with a drinking driver in the past month10. Males (20%) were more likely than females (12%) to have driven after drinking. The decision to drive after drinking or ride with someone who has been drinking seems to be related to teens’ perception of their ability to control the situation, how likely they think it is that they will be caught and how common they think the behavior is among their peers11. When teens think the chances of being caught are low (by either their parents or the police), they are more likely to drink and to drive after drinking. Research has shown that communication between teens and parents about drinking and driving is poor. Most teens surveyed said that they would choose drinking and driving rather than appear irresponsible in front of their parents. While many teens do not experience peer pressure to drive after drinking, most feel reluctant about confronting a peer about drunk driving. Consequences and Costs Teens face legal consequences for buying or consuming alcohol and represent a danger to themselves and others when they drive after drinking. In 1997, the State of Texas passed a zero tolerance law making it illegal for anyone under 21 years of age to possess alcohol or to drive with any detectable alcohol in their system. National studies suggest, however, that teens have limited awareness of these laws and that improved knowledge increases compliance12. The cost of underage drinking in Texas was $5.5 billion in 2001 including traffic deaths, violent crime, and other behaviors that threaten the well-being of youth13. Over $1.3 billion of this cost is from alcohol-related automobile crashes14. “More young people drink alcohol than use other drugs or smoke tobacco, and underage drinking costs the nation an estimated $53 billion annually in losses stemming from traffic fatalities, violent crime, and other behaviors that threaten the well-being of America’s youth15.” Effective Intervention Research has shown that underage drinking and impaired driving can be prevented in much the same way that other health-related behaviors are addressed. Changing health behavior can be accomplished on an individual, interpersonal or community level. Programs targeting individual change directly impact attitudes, knowledge and behavior of the person. Programs that strive to produce interpersonal change focus on peer influence or pressure, role modeling and social norms (what people perceive as normal or usual behavior). Programs that influence change on the community level focus on systemic changes to the environment to support healthy behaviors and discourage unhealthy behaviors. 9 When approaching complex problems like underage drinking and impaired driving, a comprehensive program with interventions at each level have the most impact. For Shattered Dreams, the primary focus is on changing the attitudes and behaviors of individuals (students and adults) regarding underage drinking and impaired driving. The program components encourage changes in thinking and behavior based on the stages of change or transtheoretical model16. According to this theory, behavior change occurs in stages with different strategies (or processes) assisting the progress through the stages. Stages of change • In the first stage, precontemplation, the individual hasn’t considered that their behavior may be problematic. • In the next stage, contemplation, the individual begins to recognize the possible problems but hasn’t committed to changing the behavior. • In the third stage, preparation, the individual has decided to change and is getting ready to do so by learning new skills. • In the fourth stage, action, the individual makes the change. • The fifth stage, maintenance, is an ongoing process of reinforcing or “sticking with” the behavior change. Shattered Dreams program components are designed to appeal to students at each stage and to facilitate progress from one stage to the next with different activities. Some activities raise awareness among those who have not considered the risks of underage drinking or impaired driving (precontemplation). Other activities provide opportunities to learn new skills that help make change possible (preparation) and still others support individuals who are initiating or maintaining alcohol-free behavior (action and maintenance). Overall, each program component motivates students to become or remain alcohol-free by: increasing the advantages (like avoiding risk) while decreasing the disadvantages (such as peer pressure) in the eyes of the students and, by increasing student’s confidence that they can do so (self-effi cacy). The Shattered Dreams program also works to produce change at interpersonal and environmental levels. Some program components support interpersonal change through observational learning or role modeling for students to observe their peers practicing alcohol-free behaviors. Similarly, activities designed to reveal misperceptions that teens and adults have about underage drinking help change notions about ‘normal’ behavior (everybody is NOT drinking). On the environmental level, the program provides parents and other adults in the community with information on risks of providing alcohol to youth while promoting the development of ongoing alcohol-free activities for youth (such as Safe Prom or Project Graduation). It is important to keep in mind that the students who directly participate in Shattered Dreams (on the planning team, as the living dead or crash participants) have the most opportunity for skills development, increased self- efficacy and change because they attend the overnight retreat and their parents attend the parental workshop. These students often becoming peer leaders on this issue and support ongoing prevention or alcohol-free activities in their schools and communities. 10 What Texas Teens Are Saying The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission completed a series of focus groups with 73 teens across Texas in 2003. The purpose was to identify trends in underage drinking, possession and/or purchases of alcoholic beverages and to gather youth input regarding their peers, law enforcement, parents, other role models and incidents that have influenced their decisions about drinking. Three key points from across the state were: • The opinions and values of parents and family members are important to teens. • Immediate and severe consequences for alcohol violations will deter underage drinking. • Young people are more interested in hearing facts and testimonials in underage drinking campaigns (versus other approaches). The students also suggested that prevention campaigns should address short-term problems and immediate issues (high school/college) versus long-term consequences. They felt that reality-based campaigns, regardless of the “scariness,” are the most effective in getting teens’ attention. References 1. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dash/yrbs/2001/youth01online/htm. 2. Liu LY. Texas School Survey of Substance Use Among Students: Grades 7-12 (2002). Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse. Available at: http://www.tcada.state.tx.us/research/survey/grades7-12/SchoolSurvey2002.pdf. 3. Wuethrich B. Getting Stupid. Discover Magazine. Available at: http://www.discover.com/issues/mar-01/features/featstupid/. Accessed 10-22-2003, 2003. 4. Grube JW, Wallack L. Television beer advertising and drinking knowledge, beliefs, and intentions among schoolchildren. American Journal of Public Health. 1994;84:254-259. 5. The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Radio daze: Alcohol ads tune in underage youth. Washington, DC: The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth; April 2 2003. 6. Mastro DE. Exposure to alcohol billboards and beliefs and attitudes toward drinking among Mexican American high school students. The Howard Journal of Communication. 2002;13:129-151. 7. Smith GTM, Denis M. Self-reported drinking and alcohol-related problems among early adolescents. Journal of Studies on Alcohol. Vol 56; 1995:383. 8. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Beginning teen drivers. March 27, 2003. Available at: http://www.iihs.org/safety_facts/teens/beginning_drivers.htm. 9. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic Safety Facts 2001: US Department of Transportation; 2001. 10. Bureau of Chronic Disease and Tobacco Prevention. Chronic Disease in Texas: Injury Among Texas Youth ­ 2001 Texas Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Austin, TX: Texas Department of Health; October 2002. 04-11373. 11. Nygaard P, Waiters ED, Grube JW, Keefe D. Why do they do it? A qualitative study of adolescent drinking and driving. Substance Use & Misuse. 2003;38(7):835-863. 12. Royal D. Volume I: Summary Report National Survey of Drinking and Driving. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Transportation - National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA); 2003. 13. Levy DT, Miller TR, Cox KC. Underage drinking: Societal costs and seller profits. Calverton, MD: PIRE; 2003. 14. Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. Underage drinking in Texas: The facts. Calverton, MD March 2004. 15. National Research Council. Reducing underage drinking: A collective responsibility. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine; September 2003. 16. Prochaska JO, DiClemente CC. Toward a Comprehensive Model of Change. In: Miller WR, Hether N, eds. Treating Addictive Behaviors: Processes of Change. New York: Plenum Press; 1986:3-27. 11 12 Eff ectiv e n ess o f Shattered Dreams The main goal of Shattered Dreams is to reduce underage drinking and impaired driving among teens. Impaired driving is driving after drinking any alcohol or riding with a driver who has been drinking. This goal is accomplished through: 1. changing teens’ beliefs about alcohol (expectancies and social norms) 2. creating positive peer influence and communication about alcohol risks among teens 3. increasing awareness of the negative health and legal consequences of underage drinking and impaired driving among teens and parents 4. increasing knowledge of underage drinking (zero tolerance) laws among teens and parents 5. increasing communication about alcohol risks between teens and parents To date, over 175 high schools have implemented Shattered Dreams throughout Texas and the United States. The program has been conducted in small, rural schools, large suburban and urban schools, and private schools. Several Texas schools have conducted the impact component (or program evaluation) of their Shattered Dreams events. More than 2000 students have completed surveys before and after participating in the program (pre-test and post-test). Results from these surveys indicate that student awareness of the risks and consequences of underage drinking and impaired driving increases after the program. These surveys also suggested that students had less positive expectancies about alcohol after participating in the program. In 2003, the South Texas Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center began a one-year program evaluation of Shattered Dreams as part of an Enforcement of Underage Drinking Laws (EUDL) program funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention through the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. This evaluation study involved three suburban high schools in San Antonio, Texas. Two schools participated in Shattered Dreams during the 2003-04 school year and the third served as a wait-listed control school. Of the students who participated in the program, 83% believed that their friends would be less likely to drive after drinking as a result of Shattered Dreams. A majority also reported that as a result of Shattered Dreams, they were more likely to talk with their friends about the risks of underage drinking and impaired driving (80% and 87%, respectively). For the complete technical report on the Shattered Dreams evaluation, visit the program website: http://sthrc.uthscsa.edu/stiprc/ 13 Impact among Parents Research has shown that parental expectations are a significant factor in preventing underage drinking. Teens whose parents express strong norms against alcohol use tend to share these values against drinking. Studies also demonstrate that parental education about drinking and impaired driving can improve parental monitoring and prevent these behaviors. In recognition of the important role parents play, two additional parental components have been developed for Shattered Dreams (the parent- student workshop and the parent retreat). Preliminary analyses of these components demonstrated increases in parent knowledge of zero tolerance laws after participating in the program. The parents also showed a greater awareness of the importance of parent-child communication to decrease risk of underage alcohol use, and of the legal consequences for adults who provide alcohol to minors. What Parents Say about Shattered Dreams* What impact do you think this program will have in your home? “[This program] provided us with an opportunity to think and better understand underage drinking and to take time and listen to our children.” “I believe that my daughter will experience a change and will place a greater value on life.” “Will allow us to be more open and involved with everyone in our family.” *Selected responses on the parent post-program survey

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